• UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    .@UCSBMensSoccer puts up a fight vs. No. 2 Clemson, but falls 3-2 in Sweet 16. RECAP >>> https://t.co/oqnHQnJzTn https://t.co/vgP5NNdQpL
    6 hours 25 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    UCSB Falls at Arizona State on Last Second Shot, 70-68 https://t.co/J0qqsxzgGY
    7 hours 23 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    And that'll do it. They battled valiantly, but @UCSBMensSoccer's season comes to and w/ a 3-2 Sweet 16 loss at Clemson. Great season guys!
    8 hours 41 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    2 mins left here, rain is really pouring now. C'mon Gauchos!
    8 hours 44 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Goal for Clemson. Tic-tac-toe passing leads to a tap-in goal for Kyle Murphy. 3-2 now w/ 11 mins to go #LetsGoGauchos
    8 hours 54 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    GOALLLLLLLL! Sloppy back pass from Clemson to the keeper, Kevin Feucht pounces on it and taps into an empty net. 2-2 w/ 20 mins left to go.
    9 hours 5 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Clemson goes up 2-1 on a goal by Diego Campos. 22 mins left for UCSB to equalize.
    9 hours 8 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    63' - Yellow card for Clemson, #6 Paul Clowes
    9 hours 14 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    62' - Nice build up for UCSB leads to a shot from the right side from Ismail Jome, but he hits the sidenetting.
    9 hours 15 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Tactical foul leading to the YC for Clemson leads to a short-side opportunity for Randy Mendoza, but his shot stays wide left.
    9 hours 22 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    58' - Yellow card for Clemson, #11 Aaron Jones
    9 hours 23 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    51' - Jome sends one to the far post from inside the 18, but his curler goes just wide.
    9 hours 29 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Second half for @UCSBMensSoccer starting now, tied w/ No. 2 Clemson 1-1! Catch the end of the game here: https://t.co/R9FRG70Get
    9 hours 36 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Halftime stats for UCSB/Clemson (tied 1-1) Shots: 8/5 Shots on Goal: 3/4 Corners: 3/2 Fouls: 13/8 Yellow cards: 1/0
    9 hours 44 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Clemson equalizes late in the first half through an Aaron Jones strike. It's 1-1 heading into halftime.
    9 hours 51 min ago

Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics Bolsters Research Connections

Program draws professors who teach at primarily undergraduate institutions
Wednesday, January 29, 2014 - 09:30
Santa Barbara, CA

You could call UC Santa Barbara’s Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics (KITP) a kind of seaside physics resort. For physicists and the like, KITP is a treat for the mind, augmented by the beauty of the campus and near-perfect weather.

“I absolutely love the place. I think it’s such an inspiring environment,” said Janna Levin, associate professor of physics and astronomy at Barnard College in Manhattan and a KITP Scholar from 2010 to 2012. “I love the workshops and the open time for spontaneous collaboration, the chance just to talk and think and work out new possibilities.”

Celebrating its 35th anniversary, KITP is a pioneering scientific research facility where theorists in physics and allied fields congregate for sustained periods of time to work together intensely on a broad range of questions arising from investigations at the leading edges of science. The breadth of topics ranges from cosmology and biology to string theory, climate science and geophysics, as well as covering such traditional physics fields as condensed matter, particle physics, atomic physics, optics, turbulence and complexity.

The KITP Scholars program was established in 1998 by David Gross during his tenure as KITP director. One of five Nobel laureates at UCSB, Gross is now a permanent member at KITP and a professor in the Department of Physics.

“I thought KITP was not taking advantage of its uniqueness or leveraging its possibilities,” Gross said. “My idea was to run a program where we could give physics professors with heavy teaching loads the opportunity to get the stimulation they need in order to continue their research careers. The KITP Scholars program has been more successful than I ever imagined.”  

The program awards funds to cover a total of three visits and up to six weeks of local expenses to be used over a period of up to three years, usually two weeks per year. Approximately eight scholars are chosen each year, with a total of more than 100 awards to date.

One of the unique aspects of the KITP Scholars program is the fact that everyone is equal, whether they come from a graduate-degree-granting university or a primarily undergraduate institution. “Everyone is a visitor and nobody is asked to do anything except to interact and do physics and talk and lecture and learn,” Gross said. “It can be the scientific highlight of their year.”

“The KITP Scholars program addresses the needs of people in undergraduate institutions,” said Dimitra Karabali, professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Lehman College, part of the City University of New York (CUNY). “Being faculty there can be challenging, because compared to major research universities, there is more teaching, more administrative duties and, most importantly, not enough research-active people to talk to.”

A KITP Scholar from 2000 to 2002, Karabali is in the middle of a second term (2013-2015). “Every time I visit KITP, it gives me an opportunity to hear new developments in my area, learn new techniques, interact with people and maybe get ideas for future projects,” she said.

Cross-pollination is at the heart of the KITP Scholars program. “One good thing about this place is its mixture of people doing different physics, so there is a lot of tolerance for questions,” said three-time KITP Scholar Peter Orland, a physics professor in the Department of Natural Sciences at CUNY’s Baruch College in Manhattan. “If I have a question or am working on a problem, I can ask people when I’m at KITP and get suggestions for resources that have the information I need. That actually happened on my last visit.”

Another early KITP Scholar, Herb Bernstein, a professor of physics at Hampshire College in Amherst, Mass., said his experience was a good one. “The work that’s most interesting to me now is something I had already started when I visited between 2000 and 2002, but it was elaborated further and developed during my time as a KITP Scholar.”

Bernstein made such important connections at KITP and valued the experience so highly that he went on to help form a professional organization that promotes research in all areas of theoretical and computational physics at primarily undergraduate institutions. Formalized in 2007, the Anacapa Society provides networking opportunities and disseminates information to create, in effect, a large virtual department of theorists to support their distinctive role at undergraduate institutions. The current KITP director, professor Lars Bildsten, is working closely with Bernstein to enable a large gathering of these theorists at KITP during the summer of 2015.

 In recent years, the Anacapa Society has solicited applications for the KITP Scholars program, offering a small additional stipend and a dash of prestige to those chosen as the KITP Anacapa Scholar. The first was Alex Small, an associate professor of physics at Cal Poly Pomona, who earned his master’s degree and Ph.D. in physics at UCSB.

“Out of each workshop and each visit, at least one idea came to fruition and became a publication or a research program,” said Levin of Barnard College. “There is no question that there were collaborations that began or were solidified at the KITP. It’s really in the collaborations that the magic happens.”

Contact Info: 

Julie Cohen
(805) 893-7220


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