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_x000B_BOYER TO DISCUSS CONTINUING DANGERS OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS

Thursday, October 8, 1998 - 17:00
Santa Barbara, CA

Historian Paul Boyer, the author of several groundbreaking books and articles on the perils of atomic weapons, will deliver a free public lecture titled "Mushrooming Fears: American Popular Culture in the Nuclear Age" at 4 p.m., Oct. 22 in UC Santa Barbara's Interdisciplinary Humanities Center (IHC).

Boyer, the Merle Curti Professor of History and director of the Institute for Research in the Humanities at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is the author of "By the Bomb's Early Light: American Thought and Culture at the Dawn of the Atomic Age" (University of North Carolina Press, 1994) and the just-released "Fallout: A Historian Reflects on America's Half-Century Encounter With Nuclear Weapons" (Ohio State University Press, 1998). His most recent article, "Living with the Bomb: A New Round of Anxiety," was published in the Chronicle of Higher Education in June.

"Paul Boyer's surveys of the cultural impact of nuclear weaponry have proven invaluable. We continue to be affected by the Cold War and its offspring, and it's absolutely vital that scholars of his stature continue to discuss the subject," said UCSB historian Lawrence Badash.

Boyer's talk will take place in the IHC's McCune Conference Room, located on the sixth floor of the campus's Humanities and Social Sciences Building. For more information, call 893-3907.