MARITAL BREAKUP AND REMARRIAGE IN THE 19TH CENTURY ARE TOPICS FOR UCSB HISTORY ASSOCIATES LECTURE

Thursday, May 16, 2002 - 17:00
Santa Barbara, CA

It is a time known for its Victorian mores, but the late 1800s nonetheless had their share of family dysfunction and dissolution.

Husbands and wives separated, divorced and sometimes deserted both inside and outside the bounds of the matrimonial laws of the day._x000B__x000B_ Beverly Schwartzberg, a lecturer in the UC Santa Barbara Department of History, did her doctoral thesis at UCSB on marital breakups in the 19th century.

She will discuss her findings in "Grass Widows, Barbarians, and Bigamists: Looking for Fluid Marriage Patterns in Nineteenth-Century America," a UCSB History Associates lecture on Tuesday, May 28 at 5:30 p.m. in Room 4020 of UCSB's Humanities and Social Sciences Building.

A reception will follow._x000B__x000B_ Tickets are $7 for History Associates members and $10 for the general public. Advance registration is required and can be made by calling the UCSB Office of Community Relations at 893-4388._x000B__x000B_ Schwartzberg was a student in UCSB's Public Historical Studies Program and received her Ph.D. in 2001. She was one of four students throughout the UC system to be awarded a Kevin Starr Fellowship in California Studies for academic 2000-2001, and, in 2001, she won UCSB's Lancaster Prize for the outstanding dissertation in the humanities and fine arts.

She is also a past five-time champion and a Tournament of Champions finalist on the television game show JEOPARDY!_x000B__x000B_ In addition to talking about her dissertation, Schwartzberg will discuss the detective work and sources she used to pursue her research._x000B__x000B_ _x000B_