UCSB University Art Museum to Make Architectural Plans Available to Owners of Homes Destroyed by the Tea Fire

Thursday, November 20, 2008 - 16:00
Santa Barbara, CA

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A drawing of a home from the collection of architect George Washington Smith.

Photo Credit: 

University Art Museum

In the aftermath of the Tea Fire, which destroyed over 200 homes in Montecito and Santa Barbara, UCSB's University Art Museum will open the archives of its renowned Architecture and Design Collection to homeowners whose houses were destroyed or damaged by the blaze. This vast collection of California modernism contains drawings, plans, photographs, blueprints, and records of many of the state's most acclaimed designers and architects.

The archive features the collections of 110 West Coast designers, including two of Santa Barbara's most important historic architects, George Washington Smith (1876-1930) and Lutah Maria Riggs (1896-1984).

In addition to these Spanish Revival style designers, the archives represent the work of modernist designers such as Gregory Ain (1908-1987), Kem Weber (1889-1963), Cliff May (1908-1989), and Edward A. Killingsworth (1917-2004), among others.

The archive also houses the collection of local architect Frank D. Robinson (1923-2004), who designed many homes on Mountain Drive, which was especially hard hit by the fire.

"The archives are typically used by historians, curators, and architects," said Kathryn Kanjo, director of the University Art Museum, "but we are also a resource for the community at large, particularly in the wake of the destruction caused by the Tea Fire. We encourage owners of buildings designed by architects in the collection to contact us for access to the archives." Added Kanjo, "For example, the archives contain plans for approximately 30 structures designed by Frank Robinson, so popular in the East Mountain and Coyote Road area. The archive may contain plans for just a small number of the houses that were lost, but we want to do what we can to help our neighbors to rebuild their homes and their lives."

A complete list of the architects can be found at www.uam.ucsb.edu.

Inquiries can be directed to adc@uam.ucsb.edu

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UAM Architecture
& Design Collection