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Orihon

Tom Burtonwood's Orihon
Wednesday, July 9, 2014 - 09:00 to Sunday, September 14, 2014 - 20:00
Arts Library, Music Building
Take “Orihon,” an artists’ book recently acquired by UC Santa Barbara. The work of Chicago-based Tom Burtonwood, it’s a three-dimensional, accordion-fold volume that is a tactile, visual assemblage of textures and reliefs printed into thick plastic. Pins and modular hinges — prototyped by the artist himself — are what hold its pages in place. Key to the particular eclecticism of the piece: Burtonwood made it using a 3-D printer — deriving its subject matter from 3-D scans of artifacts found at The Art Institute of Chicago and The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. And he released it as an open-source project, making his files available for free download to those who may be interested in printing their own versions of the work. - See more at: http://www.news.ucsb.edu/2014/014312/one-books#sthash.7aX4EcYi.dpuf The work of Chicago-based Tom Burtonwood, “Orihon” is a three-dimensional, accordion-fold volume that is a tactile, visual assemblage of textures and reliefs printed into thick plastic. Pins and modular hinges — prototyped by the artist himself — are what hold its pages in place. It was made it using a 3-D printer — deriving its subject matter from 3-D scans of artifacts found at The Art Institute of Chicago and The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Further, Burtonwood released the piece as an open-source project, making his files available for free to those who may be interested in printing their own versions of the work. Now and all summer, into mid-September, “Orihon” is on display at UCSB's Arts Library, located inside the Music Building. Hours are 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Mon.–Weds.; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thurs. and Fri.; and 4–8 p.m. on Sunday.