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Matthew Desmond “Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City”

Thursday, February 22, 2018 - 19:30 to 21:00
Matthew Desmond “Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City”
MacArthur Fellow and Harvard sociologist Matthew Desmond has forever changed the way we look at poverty in America. Desmond “set a new standard for reporting on poverty” (The New York Times) with his massively influential book Evicted, which gives pathos to the idea that eviction is a cause, rather than merely a symptom, of poverty. Evictedwon the 2017 Pulitzer Prize and was named one of the Top Books of 2016 by The New York Times, The Washington Post and The Wall Street Journal. Desmond co-founded Just Shelter, a database of community organizations working to preserve affordable housing, prevent eviction and reduce family homelessness. “A deeply humanizing and empathetic book about poverty… It’s influence on housing experts has been enormous.” Slate