• UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    .@UCSBWaterPolo defeated San Jose State 18-14 in OT to take 5th place at the GCC Championships! Read all about it h… https://t.co/bTBC559HYr
    6 hours 54 min ago
  • ucsantabarbara twitter avatar
    Federal investments in education are vital to our future. Make sure Congress hears your voice. #growCAtogether.… https://t.co/rbXzhbqudB
    15 hours 24 min ago
  • brenucsb twitter avatar
    Monitoring Coastal Zone Changes from Space: Satellite observations provide valuable data that could help coastal co… https://t.co/1oF2z8wip5
    16 hours 44 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Redhawks Rally in 4th Quarter to Upend UCSB https://t.co/0iIZkTRbqi
    1 day 5 hours ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    .@UCSB_Volleyball starts stretch run with W over CSF behind dominant performances from Ruddins and Petrachi https://t.co/89mrc3ab59
    1 day 6 hours ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Gauchos Edged In GCC Quarterfinals to UC Irvine https://t.co/X8yuTBXDTw
    1 day 7 hours ago
The Mechanics of Money First in a Series

UCSB Hosts Annual Economic Forecast Summit

Federal Reserve President James Bullard to speak about federal monetary policy
Thursday, April 21, 2016 - 09:45
Santa Barbara, CA

Bullard.jpg

James Bullard

James Bullard

Photo Credit: 

Courtesy Image

EFP 2016 Rob Arnott.jpg

Rob Arnott

Rob Arnott

Photo Credit: 

Courtesy Image

EFP 2016 Chris Ludeman.jpg

Chris Ludeman

Chris Ludeman

Photo Credit: 

Courtesy Image

Peter Rupert Photo.jpg

Peter Rupert

Peter Rupert

Photo Credit: 

Courtesy Photo

In the complex machine that is the U.S. economy, the federal funds rate — the interest rate most often in the spotlight — is a valve that controls the flow of cash from one bank to another. As interest charged on loans made between banks and credit unions, the raising or lowering of this interest rate can make or break countless financial decisions on all levels, from businesses looking to expand, to municipalities considering development projects, to individuals looking to buy a home or pay for college. Too low an interest rate and the economy might expand too rapidly; too high and the flow of cash slows.

Last December, after almost a decade of trying to spur the U.S. economy following the financial crisis of 2008, the Federal Reserve raised its interest rates by a quarter of a point. In light of weak first-quarter numbers, the Fed appears to have become more cautious about raising them further, although an increase is still on the horizon and may occur in June. Members of the Federal Open Market Committee — who vote on these rate changes in regularly scheduled meetings throughout the year — and economists at large are still somewhat divided on the pace of these increases. Meanwhile, investors and would-be borrowers at home and economies and markets abroad are on tenterhooks waiting for the FOMC’s next move on monetary policy, which could come at their meeting scheduled for April 26-27.

A week later, James Bullard, FOMC member, and president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, will come to Santa Barbara to discuss Fed policy at the 35th UC Santa Barbara Economic Forecast Project Santa Barbara County Summit, the annual rundown of the local, regional and national economy. The event takes place at the Granada Theatre in downtown Santa Barbara on Thursday, May 5. Titled “Fed Policy, Markets and Your Investments,” the Summit presents three talks on various and complex moving parts of the market, followed by the staple summary of local and regional economy and a panel discussion.

The Santa Barbara County Summit will kick off at 7:30 a.m. with a breakfast reception directly in front of the Granada Theatre on the 1200 block of State Street.

At 8:30 a.m. Economic Forecast Project (EFP) Board President Mike Pfau and UCSB Executive Vice Chancellor David Marshall will deliver opening remarks, followed at 8:45 a.m. by Peter Rupert, executive director of the UCSB EFP.

Federal Reserve President James Bullard will give the first presentation of the summit, focusing on Fed policy. The president and CEO of the St. Louis Federal Reserve Bank since 2008, Bullard and his academic research have been featured in numerous journals, and he has appeared as a commentator on CNBC, CNN, Bloomberg, BNN and Fox Business. Bullard has called for the FOMC to adopt a policy that is adjusted based on the state of the economy, and in the wake of the financial crisis, he supported quantitative easing and warned about the possibility of the United States’ falling into a Japanese-style deflationary trap. In January 2015, The Economist named Bullard the 7th most influential economist in the world.

Bullard will be followed by Rob Arnott. Arnott is the founder and chairman of investment strategy firm Research Affiliates, and a portfolio manager for Public Investment Management Company. He specializes in novel approaches to active asset allocation, optimal portfolio construction, efficient forms of indexation and other quantitative strategies. He has pioneered several portfolio strategies that are now widely applied.

Chris Ludeman will give his presentation after Arnott. Ludeman is the Global President of Capital Markets for CBRE Group, the only commercial real estate company in the Fortune 500. As president, Ludeman drives CRBE’s investor advisory business, including equity, sales, debt and real estate investment banking.

Peter Rupert will then return to the stage to present the annual summary of local and regional economic health and activity. Rupert is chair of the Department of Economics at UCSB and associate director of the campus’s Laboratory for Aggregate Economics and Finance with Nobel Laureate Finn Kydland. Rupert served as senior research advisor for the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland for 13 years.

After his talk Rupert will moderate a panel discussion between the three guest presenters to shed light on the interrelationship of monetary policy, markets and investments. Closing remarks will follow at 11 a.m. and the event will conclude at noon.

The UCSB Economic Forecast Project was established in 1981 by the Department of Economics at UCSB to provide the community with information on economic, demographic and regional business trends. Top sponsors for this year's event include Founding Sponsor Union Bank and Platinum Sponsor Montecito Bank & Trust.

The Summit is open to the public; admission is $200 per person. Cost for UCSB students is $25. For tickets and information, visit www.artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu; or call the Arts & Lectures box office at (805) 893-3535. For event information, call (805) 893-5148.

The Economic Forecast Project will shift its focus to northern Santa Barbara County with an event Friday, May 6, at the Radisson Santa Maria, 3455 Skyway Drive. http://www.efp.ucsb.edu/about/events.

Contact Info: 

Sonia Fernandez
(805) 893-4765
sonia.fernandez@ucsb.edu

Topics: