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UCSB Historians Will Discuss the Significance of Pope Benedict XVI's Resignation

Tuesday, February 26, 2013 - 16:00
Santa Barbara, CA

The announcement by Pope Benedict XVI that he will resign his office at the end of the month stunned the Catholic world. The last time a pope resigned was nearly 600 years ago, when Gregory XII stepped down in 1415 to end the schism that had produced numerous popes and anti-popes, some of whom resigned simultaneously.

In a panel discussion titled "When Popes Resign –– What Will Happen When There Are Two Living Popes?" a group of historians from UC Santa Barbara will discuss the ramifications of Pope Benedict's decision to leave office, and the issues surrounding his departure.

Sponsored by the UCSB History Associates, the panel discussion will take place at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 5, at the University Club, 1332 Santa Barbara Street. The cost is $8 for members and $10 for all others. Reservations are suggested and may be made by calling (805) 893-4388 or by sending a check, made payable to the UCSB History Associates, to the Department of History, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106.

Participating scholars include Elizabeth DePalma Digeser, professor and chair of history and a specialist in Ancient Rome; Edward D. English, adjunct associate professor of history and executive director of the Medieval Studies Program; Carol Lansing, professor of history and a specialist in Medieval Europe; and Stefania Tutino, professor of history and a specialist in Reformation Europe.

More information about the panel discussion is available at http://www.history.ucsb.edu/events.

UCSB History Associates