• UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Softball: UCSB Closes Out Mary Nutter Classic With Losses to No. 8 Washington, No. 21 Arizona State https://t.co/F5JGYXZ9Ty
    3 hours 55 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    WWP: Gauchos Defeat No. 16 UCSD in Final Game of Barbara Kalbus Invitational https://t.co/ieJb9ZsJIq
    3 hours 56 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    .@UCSB_Baseball walks off in wild series finale, clinches sweep of Tulane! RECAP >>> https://t.co/Q4akiOPaVh https://t.co/6pWsFLhNmf
    6 hours 26 min ago
  • ArtsandLectures twitter avatar
    Celebrate the traditions of the gaucho with Argentina's #CheMalambo on Sunday, Apr 23 at 7PM at UCSB Campbell Hall.… https://t.co/z7Qvi0p9UV
    14 hours 47 min ago
  • ucsantabarbara twitter avatar
    #UCSB professor Luyendyk never intended ‘Zealandia’ to be a new continent's name. https://t.co/aB4RRpsEUj
    15 hours 55 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Softball: Altmeyer Smashes Two Homers, Including Walk-Off Winner in 6-5 Win Over No. 20 Missouri https://t.co/Upedr26iud
    1 day 40 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Jacob Delson had 34 kills, most by UCSB MVB player since 2010, but Gauchos drop tight five-setter at UCI. RECAP >>>… https://t.co/q5KGaJXpXe
    1 day 2 hours ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Women's Tennis: UC Santa Barb. 0, Washington 7 (Final) UCSB Falls to 34th-ranked Washington, 0-7 https://t.co/bERvf7q21G
    1 day 3 hours ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    WWP: Gauchos Split Games on Day Two of Barbara Kalbus Invitational, Face No. 16 UCSD Tomorrow https://t.co/C2cigLAaAg
    1 day 5 hours ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    WBB: UCSB Drops Decision At #BWCWBB Leading UC Davis 70-61 To Close Regular Season Road Campaign https://t.co/Bj1F1AtnZM
    1 day 7 hours ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    .@UCSB_Baseball's offense explodes, Cohen goes yard twice in 14-1 rout of Tulane! RECAP >>> https://t.co/8weh6VX0IB https://t.co/2IvFPM1wKS
    1 day 7 hours ago
  • ucsantabarbara twitter avatar
    From theory to practice, this week's #GauchoCourse prepares soon-to-be professors for the real world. https://t.co/DAj0nUIwAw
    1 day 16 hours ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    MVB: Gauchos snap 7 match losing streak with emphatic sweep of UCSD on Friday night. RECAP >>>… https://t.co/Cee1KbeXOh
    2 days 2 hours ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Women's Tennis: UC Santa Barb. 2, Oregon 5 (Final)
    2 days 5 hours ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    WBB: Gauchos Face First-Place UC Davis Looking to End Two-Game Skid https://t.co/wRGTYxtxDC
    2 days 6 hours ago

Scientists at UCSB Discover 600 Million-Year-Old Origins of Vision

Thursday, March 11, 2010 - 16:00
Santa Barbara, CA

2199-1.jpg

Hydra, an ancient sea creature  that flourishes today.

Hydra, an ancient sea creature that flourishes today.

Photo Credit: 

Todd Oakley, UCSB

By studying the hydra, a member of an ancient group of sea creatures that is still flourishing, scientists at UC Santa Barbara have made a discovery in understanding the origins of human vision. The finding is published in this week's issue of the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, a British journal of biology.

Hydra are simple animals that, along with jellyfish, belong to the phylum cnidaria. Cnidarians first emerged 600 million years ago.

"We determined which genetic ‘gateway,' or ion channel, in the hydra is involved in light sensitivity," said senior author Todd H. Oakley, assistant professor in UCSB's Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology. "This is the same gateway that is used in human vision."

Oakley explained that there are many genes involved in vision, and that there is an ion channel gene responsible for starting the neural impulse of vision. This gene controls the entrance and exit of ions; i.e., it acts as a gateway.

The gene, called opsin, is present in vision among vertebrate animals, and is responsible for a different way of seeing than that of animals like flies. The vision of insects emerged later than the visual machinery found in hydra and vertebrate animals.

"This work picks up on earlier studies of the hydra in my lab, and continues to challenge the misunderstanding that evolution represents a ladder-like march of progress, with humans at the pinnacle," said Oakley. "Instead, it illustrates how all organisms –– humans included –– are a complex mix of ancient and new characteristics."

David Plachetzki, who received his Ph.D. for work done in the Oakley lab, is the first author. Plachetzki is now a postdoctoral fellow at UC Davis. UCSB undergraduate Caitlin R. Fong is the second author of the paper.

Todd Oakley