UCSB Nobel Laureate David Gross Elected to the American Philosophical Society

Friday, May 4, 2007 - 17:00
Santa Barbara, CA

UC Santa Barbara Physicist David Gross, who shared the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics, has been elected a fellow of the American Philosophical Society (APS), the oldest learned society in the country.

Election to the APS honors extraordinary accomplishments in all fields of intellectual endeavor.

Gross is director of UCSB's Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics (KITP), where he holds the Frederick W. Gluck Chair.

He was one of 52 new members selected by his peers to join the distinguished society.

Those recently elected bring the total number of active members to 960 throughout the world.

Since 1900, more than 260 members of the society have received the Nobel Prize.

"David Gross is an ideal choice for this society that fosters intellectual inquiry and critical thought in the service of humanity," said UCSB Chancellor Henry T. Yang.

"He joins and brings even greater honor to an illustrious group of members that includes founder Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, Charles Darwin, Thomas Edison, and Albert Einstein, among other luminaries."

Today, the American Philosophical Society honors and engages leading scholars, scientists and professionals through elected membership, and supports research, discovery and education through grants and fellowships, lectures, publications, prizes, and exhibitions.

Gross shared the Nobel Prize in Physics for solving what was considered to be the last great remaining problem of the "Standard Model" of the quantum mechanical picture of reality.

He and his co-recipients—Frank Wilczek of M.I.T. and H. David Politzer of Caltech—discovered how the nucleus of an atom works.

Gross joined the UCSB faculty in January 1997.

He received his Ph.D. from UC Berkeley.

For 31 years he was on the faculty at Princeton University.

He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

His many honors and awards include the J. J. Sakurai Prize of the American Physical Society, a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship Prize, and France's highest scientific honor, the Grande Médaille D'Or (the Grand Gold Medal).

American Philosophical Society
David Gross

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