• UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Halftime stats for UCSB/Clemson (tied 1-1) Shots: 8/5 Shots on Goal: 3/4 Corners: 3/2 Fouls: 13/8 Yellow cards: 1/0
    48 min 11 sec ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Clemson equalizes late in the first half through an Aaron Jones strike. It's 1-1 heading into halftime.
    55 min 6 sec ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Gooooaaaaaal!!!! Seo-In Kim with the goal to put @UCSBMensSoccer up 1-0 with 6 left in opening half.
    1 hour 1 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    @UCSBMensSoccer Sam Strong in for Nick DePuy with 12 left in 1st half
    1 hour 7 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    30' - Long range effort from DePuy goes way wide. Both teams have a harder time creating chances.
    1 hour 11 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    24' - shot from the left side from Acheampong, save Tarbell
    1 hour 17 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    '21 - Kevin Feucht has a point blank look at net, but his redirection goes just over the crossbar.
    1 hour 21 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Big save from Vom Steeg, diving low to his left to stop a Tasner shot in the 20th min
    1 hour 22 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Ish Jome unleashes a 35 yd laser for UCSB's first shot on goal, requiring a save from Clemson keeper Andrew Tarbell. 25 mins left in the 1st
    1 hour 22 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Gauchos enjoying the run of play so far, but havent recorded a shot yet. 35 mins to go in the first.
    1 hour 32 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Yellow card for UCSB: Randy Mendoza in the 7th min.
    1 hour 33 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Justin Vom Steeg coming up big early for UCSB, making a pair of saves on T.J. Cashner (10 goals for Clemson). 38:00 left in the 1st half.
    1 hour 35 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Duncan Backus knocks home a Geoffrey Acheampong free kick from 30 yds out, but a late offside whistle negates an early goal for UCSB
    1 hour 37 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    And we're underway here in Clemson! Here's that @ESPN3 link one more time: https://t.co/R9FRG70Get
    1 hour 43 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    @UCSBMensSoccer about to take on #2 Clemson https://t.co/q5HJrSMQtM
    1 hour 46 min ago

Past Antarctic Ice Sheet Development Linked to Ocean Temperatures and Carbon Dioxide

Thursday, September 16, 2004 - 17:00
Santa Barbara, CA


Iceberg, Davis Sea, East Antarctica.

Photo Credit: 

Robert Dunbar

New research published in the September 17 issue of the journal Science sheds light on the evolution of Earth's climate system by identifying changes in temperature, ocean circulation, and global carbon cycling associated with the rapid growth of Antarctic ice sheets approximately 14 million years ago.

By studying chemical changes in deep sea sediments, scientists at the University of California, Santa Barbara discovered that high-latitude Southern Ocean cooling helped to trigger this major expansion of Antarctic ice sheets, which have since become a permanent feature of the global climate system. These results document ice sheet history and supply crucial insight into the dynamics of the global climate system.

Scientists have long recognized that the Southern Ocean and the development of Antarctic ice sheets play a major role in the evolution of Earth's present climate system. Only now have researchers been able to obtain a clearer picture of the relationship between high-latitude temperatures, global carbon cycling and the size of Antarctic ice sheets.

Southern Ocean temperature data exhibits a rapid 7 degree cooling of surface waters around 14 million years ago and suggests a strengthening of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current in response to changes in the geometry of Earth's orbits. As a result, Antarctica became increasingly isolated from tropical heat and moisture sources. Records of Antarctic ice volume indicate that following this cooling ice sheets expanded rapidly to near present-day size, which suggests that changes in the Southern Ocean directly influence the size of the Antarctic ice sheet.

UCSB researchers speculate that the climate system responded quickly to orbital variations because of generally low atmospheric carbon dioxide levels and plate tectonic changes north and south of Australia.

"Our study indicates that the sensitivity of Earth's climate system can shift rapidly when climate boundary conditions, such as atmospheric greenhouse gas levels or the configuration of the continents, change," said Amelia Shevenell, the lead author of the Science study and a Ph.D. candidate at UCSB.

"Our results suggest that scientifically it is somewhat incidental whether these boundary conditions are altered via natural or human-induced processes," she said. "If the boundary conditions change, we should expect Earth's climate system to respond."

Shevenell and co-authors Jim Kennett and David Lea, both professors of geological sciences at UCSB, developed the records of Southern Ocean sea surface temperature change, Antarctic ice volume, and global carbon cycling by measuring chemical changes in the fossilized skeletal remains of marine plankton contained in deep-sea sediments. Shevenell and Kennett collected these sediments south of Tasmania when they sailed as scientists on the Ocean Drilling Program's drill ship, the JOIDES Resolution.

This research was supported by the National Science Foundation and Joint Oceanographic Institutes.

For additional information, visit these web sites:
Jim Kennett Site http://www.geol.ucsb.edu/faculty/kennett/
David Lea Site http://www.geol.ucsb.edu/faculty/lea/
Geological Sciences Dept http://www.geol.ucsb.edu/
National Science Foundation http://www.nsf.gov/
Science Magazine http://www.sciencemag.org/

Jim Kennett Site
David Lea Site
Geological Sciences Department

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