• UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    .@UCSBMensSoccer puts up a fight vs. No. 2 Clemson, but falls 3-2 in Sweet 16. RECAP >>> https://t.co/oqnHQnJzTn https://t.co/vgP5NNdQpL
    11 hours 51 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    UCSB Falls at Arizona State on Last Second Shot, 70-68 https://t.co/J0qqsxzgGY
    12 hours 48 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    And that'll do it. They battled valiantly, but @UCSBMensSoccer's season comes to and w/ a 3-2 Sweet 16 loss at Clemson. Great season guys!
    14 hours 7 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    2 mins left here, rain is really pouring now. C'mon Gauchos!
    14 hours 9 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Goal for Clemson. Tic-tac-toe passing leads to a tap-in goal for Kyle Murphy. 3-2 now w/ 11 mins to go #LetsGoGauchos
    14 hours 20 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    GOALLLLLLLL! Sloppy back pass from Clemson to the keeper, Kevin Feucht pounces on it and taps into an empty net. 2-2 w/ 20 mins left to go.
    14 hours 30 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Clemson goes up 2-1 on a goal by Diego Campos. 22 mins left for UCSB to equalize.
    14 hours 33 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    63' - Yellow card for Clemson, #6 Paul Clowes
    14 hours 40 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    62' - Nice build up for UCSB leads to a shot from the right side from Ismail Jome, but he hits the sidenetting.
    14 hours 40 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Tactical foul leading to the YC for Clemson leads to a short-side opportunity for Randy Mendoza, but his shot stays wide left.
    14 hours 47 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    58' - Yellow card for Clemson, #11 Aaron Jones
    14 hours 48 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    51' - Jome sends one to the far post from inside the 18, but his curler goes just wide.
    14 hours 54 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Second half for @UCSBMensSoccer starting now, tied w/ No. 2 Clemson 1-1! Catch the end of the game here: https://t.co/R9FRG70Get
    15 hours 1 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Halftime stats for UCSB/Clemson (tied 1-1) Shots: 8/5 Shots on Goal: 3/4 Corners: 3/2 Fouls: 13/8 Yellow cards: 1/0
    15 hours 10 min ago
  • UCSBgauchos twitter avatar
    Clemson equalizes late in the first half through an Aaron Jones strike. It's 1-1 heading into halftime.
    15 hours 17 min ago


Tuesday, November 30, 1999 - 16:00
Santa Barbara, CA

Paul Hansma, professor of physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara, has won the 2000 Biological Physics Prize from the American Physical Society.

A prize from the American Physical Society is one of the highest honors a physicist can receive. It symbolizes the admiration of a physicist's peers for the recipient's accomplishments and contributions to physics.

Fellow physicists recognized Hansma for pioneering contributions to the development of biological scanning probe microscopy and for the molecular resolution imaging of biological molecules in aqueous solutions.

Hansma and his research group design and build scanning probe microscopes, such as the Atomic Force Microscope, for biological and medical applications. They built a series of Atomic Forces Microscopes (AFMs) that served as prototypes for commercially successful AFMs developed and marketed by Digital Instruments, a Santa Barbara company. Now, as a result of about five years of research, the group has prototypes for a new generation of AFMs that can monitor the activity of individual protein molecules.

This new technology has allowed a team of researchers from his group and the UC Santa Barbara research group of his wife, Helen Hansma, to study the functions of two proteins that can shed light on how these molecules help other proteins fold correctly into the three dimensional shapes that they need to function.

Hansma and his group also invented the Scanning Ion Conductance Microscope (SICM), which can measure the ion conductance through pores in membranes. Recently, the physics professor used this microscope with the AFM to help two UC Santa Barbara research teams uncover the secret behind the strength of abalone shells.

"We are excited about the possibility of making a new generation of adhesives and fibers based on what we have learned, " said Hansma.

Hansma holds a Ph.D. in physics from UC Berkeley. He joined the UC Santa Barbara faculty in 1972.

He has written about 270 articles, including 15 in Science and five in Nature. He holds nine U.S. patents including fundamental, licensed patents in Scanning Probe Microscopy. Five patents are pending including some on a new generation of AFMs that use much smaller cantilevers than present commercial AFMs.

Founded in 1899, the American Physical Society is an organization of more than 40,000 physicists worldwide. It is dedicated to the advancement and diffusion of the knowledge of physics. The society publishes some of the world's leading physics research journals: the Physical Review series, Physical Review Letters, and Reviews of Modern Physics.

Editors: A J-peg image of Paul Hansma is available upon request.

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