• ArtsandLectures twitter avatar
    KCRW DJ Raul Campos is doing the killer music set right now at the Courthouse! Bogie and Bacall. #kcrw https://t.co/Lw9PHUGugS
    14 hours 36 min ago
  • ArtsandLectures twitter avatar
    75 minutes until showtime. Bogie and Bacall in THE BIG SLEEP. #sbsummercinema https://t.co/21aRG3Gbmc
    14 hours 40 min ago
  • ArtsandLectures twitter avatar
    KCRW DJ Raul Campos is spinning the tunes NOW at the Courthouse!! THE BIG SLEEP at 8:30. Be here!! https://t.co/7DkUeAP1BP
    14 hours 44 min ago
  • ucsantabarbara twitter avatar
    Scholars from diverse backgrounds gathered at #UCSB to examine how people with widely differing beliefs can coexist. https://t.co/Gp9UoEVX2s
    15 hours 20 min ago
  • brenucsb twitter avatar
    https://t.co/9fc8f6UgIp
    16 hours 45 min ago
  • ArtsandLectures twitter avatar
    Do not go gentle into that good night, see @KCRW DJ @raulcampos spin tonight at the Courthouse before The Big Sleep! https://t.co/kgLcgFxpT4
    17 hours 23 min ago
  • UCSBLibrary twitter avatar
    James Alan McPherson, 1st black writer to win Pulitzer Prize for fiction, died Wednesday. https://t.co/6j5gngFtFq https://t.co/nXeefjDzNy
    21 hours 57 min ago
  • UCSBengineering twitter avatar
    RT @Sowjumn: If you r a Gaucho and u work in tech or want 2 have a career in tech do follow @gauchosintech 4 news abt events, jobs & networ…
    22 hours 31 min ago

BACTERIAL 'KILLING MACHINES' SUBJECT OF PLOUS LECTURE

Thursday, April 30, 1998 - 17:00
Santa Barbara, CA

When it comes to bacterial disease, the wake-up call has been sounded, warns microbiologist Michael J. Mahan, this year's Plous Award honoree.

"Our microbial defenses are crumbling as superior pathogens have emerged that can no longer be controlled by available antibiotics," says Mahan, assistant professor of molecular, cellular, and developmental biology at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

"Many of these bacteria that were once merely a nuisance have recently evolved into efficient killing machines," says Mahan. "Over 30 new diseases have emerged within the last 20 years."

Mahan will delivered the 40th annual Harold J. Plous Memorial Lecture, titled "Emerging Pathogens: What You Don't Know Can Kill You," at Girvetz Theater on Thursday, April 30. The talk will focussed on the danger in the food supply, common sense tips to reduce the risk of infection, and research aimed at increasing the safety of food.

Mahan studies salmonella, a pathogen that infects 4 million people in the United States every year. There are 2,500 different strains of salmonella, which are responsible for causing diseases ranging from food poisoning to typhoid fever, says Mahan. "Very similar strains of salmonella can give enormously different disease manifestations," he said, noting that young children are the most vulnerable.

Mahan's research is focused on understanding the mechanisms by which bacterial pathogens cause disease. He has developed a new approach to the isolation of bacterial virulence factors, termed IVET for in vivo expression technology. IVET allows researchers to observe how bacteria trigger their killing functions in living cells. A report on this research is

published in this month's "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences."

Mahan joined the UCSB faculty in 1993 after several years as a post-doctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School. In 1994 he received the Newcomb-Cleveland Prize from the American Association for the Advancement of Science for the outstanding paper published in Science. He is also recipient of an American Cancer Society Junior Faculty Science Research Award and a Beckman Young Investigator Award.

The Plous Award honors the assistant professor in the College of Letters and Science who has made the greatest contribution to the intellectual life of the university through outstanding teaching, research, and community service. Harold J. Plous, for whom the award is named, was an assistant professor of economics at UCSB who died in 1957.